Fundamentals: One-on-one meetings

29 May
partnershipLeadership is socially demanding. Interaction with those you lead (and hopefully serve) is necessary. I’ve found that it is very unlikely that we as leaders will consistently behave as we wish to – recognizing, coaching, supporting, developing, empowering and engaging…more – without creating some type of structural space/time and process to enable it. A practice that I use and recommend is creating a norm around meeting with each member of your team for one-on-one discussions to focus on their personal learning and performance.
Commit to meeting with each of your direct reports on a consistent frequency. For me, the minimum is 30 minutes bi-weekly. It’s their meeting, so I ask them to schedule the time in open space on my calendar at a time that works for them, booking 3 – 6 months into the future. I’m available for more if they want or need it. Our meetings do get moved as needed, but very rarely cancelled.
I require a written update around a loosely structured agenda built around roles I want to play as their leader:
  • to provide recognition – My Accomplishments (what have you accomplished since we met last?)
  • to serve their needs and support them – My Needs (what can I do that will be helpful to you?)
  • to build trusting relationships – FYI’s (no action needed updates), My Team (skip-level updates)
  • to engage and develop – My Development (what have you planned or accomplished to learn, experience and connect to develop yourself?)
  • to coach and empower performance – My Project Updates (what’s the status / how are you planning to progress?)
The purpose of the written update sent in advance is it allows us to make better use of our time together discussing and responding to the situation rather than using our limited time describing it.
Feedback I’ve received on the process:
  • I get a sense of satisfaction reporting my progress and it forces me to acknowledge ownership of my work.
  • Conversely, knowing the time is coming where I will report on my status and what has been accomplished (or not) also motivates me; I want to avoid having nothing to report but excuses.
  • I like having the consistency. It’s easier to get my needs met without feeling I need to “interrupt” as often.

I’ve provided the same update to my bosses over the years and the process makes me better. One thing that is certain is that if I, as the leader, didn’t set the expectation and require the process, entropy would set in; preparation and the good use of our time would end and I’d likely have what most others do with their time.

Committing to this structure and process makes me a better leader and my team members better performers. It also scales really nicely for those of us that manage global, remote or virtual teams.
If you decide to give it a try, let me know how it works for you.
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3 Responses to “Fundamentals: One-on-one meetings”

  1. Stevens, Jason May 29, 2013 at 3:30 am #

    Thanks Brandon – I agree wholeheartedly – if we don’t plan it then it doesn’t happen! By scheduling the meetings and by working through a broad agenda the message is also that the conversation is important to the leader ..

  2. Martin Baumeister May 29, 2013 at 9:01 pm #

    Hi Brandon, I’ve had very good success over the years with this concept. I’m scheduling the meeting myself though. This gives me control over my time and ensures that I reschedule the meeting – forces me to find time on my agenda. I’m committed to have the meeting at least bi-weekly. One advantage I see also by having the meetings and have the employee track what was discussed is also that they are holding me accountable. I also encourage them to put issues which can wait on the list for the next meeting. This way I see less interruptions and get more done. Btw. you also might need the written update for audit purposes.

    • brandon curry May 29, 2013 at 9:13 pm #

      Thanks for sharing Martin. It definitely helps to have the notes to refer back to for trends as well. You begin to see themes emerge if you across a quarter or two. Good to hear from you.

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